National science foundation doctoral dissertation grant

The “science communication problem,” as it’s blandly called by the scientists who study it, has yielded abundant new research into how people decide what to believe—and why they so often don’t accept the scientific consensus. It’s not that they can’t grasp it, according to Dan Kahan of Yale University. In one study he asked 1,540 Americans, a representative sample, to rate the threat of climate change on a scale of zero to ten. Then he correlated that with the subjects’ science literacy. He found that higher literacy was associated with stronger views—at both ends of the spectrum. Science literacy promoted polarization on climate, not consensus. According to Kahan, that’s because people tend to use scientific knowledge to reinforce beliefs that have already been shaped by their worldview.

National science foundation doctoral dissertation grant

national science foundation doctoral dissertation grant

Media:

national science foundation doctoral dissertation grantnational science foundation doctoral dissertation grantnational science foundation doctoral dissertation grantnational science foundation doctoral dissertation grant