Reaching common ground essay contest

This film offers a great introduction to the River Tweed and the work of Tweed Forum.  It was submitted in support of our our nomination for the Thiess International River Prize 2017. The River Tweed was one of only four rivers to make it through to the final of the global competition and came a close second to the eventual winner, the San Antonio River in Texas for its $384 million improvement project. The Tweed had made it through to the final four in recognition of the unique partnership approach developed by the Tweed Forum in order to protect and conserve the natural, built and cultural heritage of the river and its 5,000 sq km catchment.

At the heart of land and water management on Tweed.........
Tweed Forum was formed in 1991 "to promote the sustainable use of the whole of the Tweed catchment through holistic and integrated management and planning".  In close partnership with our members , Tweed Forum works to protect, enhance and restore the rich natural, built and cultural heritage of the River Tweed and its tributaries. The Forum works at both the strategic level and the project level  in order to achieve tangible benefits on the ground. From our inception as an informal liaison group, we have grown to become a leader in the field of integrated land and water management. A short video highlighting some of our recent work is available here .


Virga can cause varying weather effects, because as rain is changed from liquid to vapor form, it removes heat from the air due to the high heat of vaporization of water. Precipitation falling into these cooling down drafts may eventually reach the ground. In some instances, these pockets of colder air can descend rapidly, creating a wet or dry microburst which can be extremely hazardous to aviation . Conversely, precipitation evaporating at high altitude can compressionally heat as it falls, and result in a gusty downburst which may substantially and rapidly warm the surface temperature. This fairly rare phenomenon, a heat burst , also tends to be of exceedingly dry air.

  1. Mary Ann (Polly) Nichols, murdered Friday, August 31, 1888.
  2. Annie Chapman, murdered Saturday, September 8, 1888.
  3. Elizabeth Stride, murdered Sunday, September 30, 1888.
  4. Catharine Eddowes, also murdered that same date.
  5. Mary Jane (Marie Jeanette) Kelly, murdered Friday, November 9, 1888.
Besides these five there are good reasons to believe that the first victim was really Martha Tabram who was murdered Tuesday, August 7, 1888, and there are important considerations for questioning whether Stride was a Ripper victim. As to the actual number of women that the Ripper killed, Philip Sugden wrote in his excellent book, The Complete History of Jack the Ripper, "There is no simple answer. In a sentence: at least four, probably six, just possibly eight."

The Bureau of Meteorology is responsible for providing the Australian community with warnings of dangerous weather, in order to minimise damage and injury. A Severe Thunderstorm Warning is issued when a severe thunderstorm is reported, or there is strong evidence of a severe thunderstorm, and it is expected to persist. Severe thunderstorm warning services are provided from the Bureau's Regional Forecasting Centres in State and Territory capitals. Forecasters use computer model predictions, together with data from satellite pictures, radar displays, lightning detection networks, ground-based observations and reports from "storm spotters" to prepare the warnings. The radar displays are particularly helpful to thunderstorm forecasters by indicating where and how heavily rain is falling. Also, the Australian network of napproximately 3000 volunteer storm spotters provide valuable reports of severe weather to forecasters.

Severe storm warnings are immediately transmitted to radio and television stations, to authorities such as the police and emergency services, and to the Bureau's public access systems, which include recorded telephone services, Weather By Fax and the Internet.

Reaching common ground essay contest

reaching common ground essay contest

The Bureau of Meteorology is responsible for providing the Australian community with warnings of dangerous weather, in order to minimise damage and injury. A Severe Thunderstorm Warning is issued when a severe thunderstorm is reported, or there is strong evidence of a severe thunderstorm, and it is expected to persist. Severe thunderstorm warning services are provided from the Bureau's Regional Forecasting Centres in State and Territory capitals. Forecasters use computer model predictions, together with data from satellite pictures, radar displays, lightning detection networks, ground-based observations and reports from "storm spotters" to prepare the warnings. The radar displays are particularly helpful to thunderstorm forecasters by indicating where and how heavily rain is falling. Also, the Australian network of napproximately 3000 volunteer storm spotters provide valuable reports of severe weather to forecasters.

Severe storm warnings are immediately transmitted to radio and television stations, to authorities such as the police and emergency services, and to the Bureau's public access systems, which include recorded telephone services, Weather By Fax and the Internet.

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