Women's rights essay

Next: Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act was passed, prohibiting employment discrimination on the basis of sex as well as race, religion, and national origin. The category “sex” was included as a last-ditch effort to kill the bill. But it passed, nevertheless. With its passage, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission was established to investigate discrimination complaints. Within the commission’s first five years, it received 50,000 sex discrimination complaints. But it was quickly obvious that the commission was not very interested in pursuing these complaints. Betty Friedan, the chairs of the various state Commissions on the Status of Women, and other feminists agreed to form a civil rights organization for women similar to the NAACP. In 1966, the National Organization for Women was organized, soon to be followed by an array of other mass-membership organizations addressing the needs of specific groups of women, including Blacks, Latinas, Asians-Americans, lesbians, welfare recipients, business owners, aspiring politicians, and tradeswomen and professional women of every sort.

In the colonized states, the colonizers used the “woman question” to justify their dominance, claiming that women in their subject nations were “backward” and in need of “uplifting.” Ignoring the demands of women in their own countries, they were sometimes more willing to push for women’s reforms abroad. On the other hand, nationalistic movements in colonized and other non-western nations began to link attempts at modernization with an improvement in the status of women. In many instances, liberal nationalists, many of them male, needed the active support of women to help fulfill their dream of an independent, modern state.

Muslims: Women and Islam:
http:///wgbh/pages/frontline/ shows/muslims/themes/
Is Islam inherently discriminatory? What is Muslim women's role in the Islamic resurgence? And what does it mean to be a Muslim "feminist"?

Muslim Women's League Web Site:
http://
The Muslim Women's League is a nonprofit American Muslim organization working to implement the values of Islam and thereby reclaim the status of women as free and equal.

Women in Afghanistan:
http:///newshour/bb/asia/july -dec01/afghanwomen_11-
Four Afghan women talk to NewsHour about their repression during Taliban rule. (November 2001)

Introduction to Islam:
http:///library/islam/
This introductory book on Islam includes a chapter on women.

Biographical Sketches:
http:///
Biographical sketches of influential Muslim women

Women, Class, and Islam during the Ottoman Empire:
http:///ottoman /module2/
A tutorial on women, class, and Islam during the Ottoman Empire

Rabi'ah:
http:///~ddisse/
Biographies on Rabia, one of the first Sufis, including translated quotations from her speeches

The Muslim Sisters' Homepage:
http:///sisters/
This Web site is meant to help people to understand the true stance Islam takes on gender issues and the role of women.

Women in Iran:
http:///visavis/women_
Vis à Vis discusses women's rights in Iran, pre-Islamic Revolution through today.

Gender Issues in Islam:
http:///wgbh/pages/frontline/teach/muslims/
Students will compare and contrast the roles of men and women with regard to various topics in the six countries featured in the film.

A Woman's Place:
http:///visavis/resources_
Students will learn about women's status in Iran and the . across different points in history, explain why women in Iran dress and interact with men in specific ways, and relate this to certain groups/religions in the ., and adopt the perspective of a woman living at a different time in the . or Iran.

Divas: The Interviews:
http:///adventuredivas/iran/divas/
Interviews with Iranian women about poetry, religion, politics, marriage, film, youth, and freedom of the press

Reaching Across the Divide:
http:///news/specials/sixmonths/
Attacks prompt a Muslim woman to teach others about her faith, dispel myths, and build understanding.

Center for Near Eastern Studies: Media: Veiling and the Media:
http:///cnes/outreach/media/veiling/
This site provides a variety of viewpoints and resources in the Western popular media that look at veiling of Muslim women.

Liberal activists reject guardianship, loving or not, as demeaning to women. They object to being treated like "subordinates" and "children". [23] [27] They point to women whose careers were ended by the guardians, or who lost their children because of a lack of custody rights. In a 2009 case, a father vetoed several of his daughter's attempts to marry outside their tribe, and sent her to a mental institution as punishment. [55] The courts recognize obedience to the father as law, even in cases involving adult daughters. [56] Saudi activist Wajeha Al-Huwaider agrees that most Saudi men are caring, but "it's the same kind of feeling they have for handicapped people or for animals. The kindness comes from pity, from lack of respect.” [20] She compares male guardianship to slavery: [36]

Women's rights essay

women's rights essay

Liberal activists reject guardianship, loving or not, as demeaning to women. They object to being treated like "subordinates" and "children". [23] [27] They point to women whose careers were ended by the guardians, or who lost their children because of a lack of custody rights. In a 2009 case, a father vetoed several of his daughter's attempts to marry outside their tribe, and sent her to a mental institution as punishment. [55] The courts recognize obedience to the father as law, even in cases involving adult daughters. [56] Saudi activist Wajeha Al-Huwaider agrees that most Saudi men are caring, but "it's the same kind of feeling they have for handicapped people or for animals. The kindness comes from pity, from lack of respect.” [20] She compares male guardianship to slavery: [36]

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